Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10321/4404
Title: Juvenile offenders’ rehabilitation programmes in the Department of Correctional Services in Durban management area
Authors: Hadebe, Vusumuzi James 
Keywords: Rehabilitation;Rehabilitation programmes;Juvenile offenders;Ex-juvenile offenders;Criminal mindsets;Sentence;Crime-free;Reintegration
Issue Date: Aug-2020
Abstract: 
The White Paper on Corrections in South Africa, 2004 makes provision for the
rehabilitation of offenders who are sentenced by the South African courts to between two
years and life imprisonment. The study was aimed at ascertaining if the juvenile offenders
who were serving their respective sentences in the Durban Management Area
participated in rehabilitation programmes because they saw the value, need and
importance in the role that these programmes could play in assisting them to change their
criminal mindsets. The study used the mixed methods approach, where a total of 150
juvenile offenders who were serving their prison terms were sampled. Qualitative in-depth
interviews were targeted whereby the spiritual care worker, three social workers and ten
educators were interviewed. The study was also extended to the ten ex-juvenile offenders
who once participated in the rehabilitation programmes to establish how participating in
rehabilitation programmes benefitted them and whether the acquired skills assisted them
with reintegration into their respective societies and in leading a crime-free life.
The significance of this study emanated from the literature, which points out that the
juvenile offenders and other categories of offenders repeat their crimes after their release.
This, therefore, begs the question: ‘Why is this happening?’ despite the fact Department
of Correctional Services (DCS) has rehabilitation programmes which are aimed at
changing the criminal mindsets of all offenders to desist from committing crime again.
This study was, therefore, expected to find the answer to this question and to assist the
Department of Correctional Services to tailor its rehabilitation programmes in a manner
that will maximally impact the juvenile offenders. The study was also intended to
contribute towards the body of knowledge in the field of behavioural sciences. The
managerial implication of the study was that it might inform the new policy direction that
the Department of Correctional Services might take based on the findings.
The study found that most of the juvenile offenders agreed that they participated in
rehabilitation programmes because they wanted to change their criminal mindsets. 95%
of the juvenile offenders stated that they were positively impacted by the rehabilitation
programmes and therefore, their attitude towards crime and criminality had changed. The study also found that 91% of the juvenile offenders participated in rehabilitation because
they saw the need, value and importance of rehabilitation programmes. Interestingly 93%
of the juvenile offenders mentioned that they would never commit a crime again. It
emerged in the study that juvenile offenders were mostly impacted by the education and
training programmes. It transpired that of the ten ex-juvenile offenders who were
interviewed, five were now university graduates and were employed. Two of the exjuvenile offenders were qualified Chartered Accountants and had had their criminal
records expunged. The other two were lecturers at two institutions of higher learning in
KwaZulu-Natal. One ex-juvenile offender who had B. Comm Accounting degree owned a
property business and employed four graduates who had never been to prison.
It emerged in the study that amongst the challenges faced by ex-juvenile offenders was
the fact that they were unemployable because of their criminal records. In this study, the
author argued that there was tangible evidence that the juvenile offenders in the Durban
Management Area were positively impacted by the rehabilitation programmes delivered
to them. This was evident in education and training programmes. It was also the argument
of this study that criminal records negate all the efforts of ex-juvenile offenders to lead a
crime-free life. This, therefore, meant that there should be a policy shift which would
address this challenge.
The study, therefore, recommended that the current and ex-juvenile offenders should be
provided with entrepreneurial skills so that they could open and manage their businesses
on their release from the prison. This could be an opportunity for institutions like the
Durban University of Technology Entrepreneurial Department to partner with the
Department of Correctional Services as a community outreach programme and roll out
these much-needed entrepreneurial skills to juvenile offenders. This could also be the
Durban University of Technology’s contribution to crime prevention, poverty alleviation
and employment creation.
Description: 
Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy in Management Sciences (Public Administration), Durban, South Africa, 2020.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10321/4404
DOI: https://doi.org/10.51415/10321/4404
Appears in Collections:Theses and dissertations (Management Sciences)

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