Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10321/1514
Title: An evaluation of the culture of patient safety as a critical element of healthcare in a public hospital in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal
Authors: Govender, Vathanayagie 
Issue Date: 2016
Abstract: 
Aim
The study evaluated the culture of patient safety and the factors that contribute and influence patient safety as a critical element, to healthcare in a public hospital in Kwa-Zulu Natal, through a predesigned questionnaire with the objectives of establishing the current status of the culture of patient safety in the said hospital, evaluating responses from nurses and doctors and other healthcare professionals, exploring the effectiveness of communication and teamwork within units and hospital.
Methods
The study evaluated the culture of patient safety and the factors that contribute and influence patient safety as a critical element, to healthcare in a public hospital in Kwa-Zulu Natal, through a predesigned questionnaire with the objectives of establishing the current status of the culture of patient safety in the said hospital, evaluating responses from nurses and doctors and other healthcare professionals, exploring the effectiveness of communication and teamwork within units and hospital.
Results
The resultant data from the predesigned questionnaire was divided into components of teamwork within and between units, hospital and supervisor management support for patient safety, communication openness and feedback regarding errors, non-punitive response to errors, hospital handover of information staffing and overall patient safety grade. The study was compared to the studies in the US and three other countries across the European continent, Netherland, Taiwan, and US [Wagner et al. 2013]. The findings as possible strengths of the study were teamwork within units, learning in the organization, feedback and communication, and manager and supervisor support for patient safety. The areas that needed attention were teamwork across units, communication openness, staffing, non-punitive response to errors and overall patient safety grade, handover of information between units.
Conclusions
The findings, reflective of a developing country, compared to the findings from similar studies in developed countries such as the USA and countries in transition such as Netherlands and Taiwan. In reference to the precincts that face a developing country such as South Africa, certain highlights emerged from the comparison, as areas of strength, areas requiring attention, and a preliminary insight into current practices within the South African context which can be viewed as an opportunity to sustain current good practices and inform future research.
Description: 
Submitted in fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Health Sciences in Nursing, Durban University of Technology, Durban, South Africa, 2016.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10321/1514
DOI: https://doi.org/10.51415/10321/1514
Appears in Collections:Theses and dissertations (Health Sciences)

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