Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10321/3065
Title: Perceptions of chiropractors in the eThekwini Municipality on the integration of chiropractic into the public healthcare sector of South Africa
Authors: Davies, Natalie 
Issue Date: 2018
Abstract: 
Background
Currently, chiropractic is not incorporated into the South African public healthcare sector despite its emphasis on the values of wellness and health. This is due to a poor relationship with mainstream medical practitioners, the construct of chiropractic education and its long standing isolation within the healthcare system within South Africa. The public healthcare sector in South Africa is strained. Low back pain is one of the main reasons patients seek medical attention from primary medical doctors. A growing body of evidence is now emerging which supports the role of chiropractic in post-­surgical rehabilitation and the treatment of extraspinal non-­pathological musculoskeletal conditions. Based on the findings of these studies, an argument could be made for the transition of chiropractic from a mainly private practice base to one that would enable it to reach to the wider population in the public healthcare sector.

Aim
The aim of the research study was to explore and describe the perceptions that chiropractors have about the integration of the chiropractic profession into the South African public healthcare sector.


Method
A descriptive exploratory qualitative approach was used to guide the study. In-­ depth interviews were conducted with ten chiropractors within the eThekwini municipality. The main research question for this study was “What are the perceptions of chiropractors in the eThekwini Municipality on the integration of chiropractic into the public healthcare sector of South Africa?” The data was analysed through thematic analysis.

Results
The main themes that emerged were the role of chiropractic in the healthcare system, the integration of chiropractic into the healthcare sector and the challenges facing chiropractors in the healthcare system. The themes and sub-­ themes were as follows;;

• Theme 1 Role of chiropractic in the healthcare system Sub-­theme 1.1 Primary contact for neuromuscular medicine.

• Theme 2 Integration of chiropractors into the public healthcare sector Sub-­theme 2.1 Relief of overworked healthcare workers.
Sub-­theme 2.2 Decrease costs in surgical and medication use.


Sub-­theme 2.3 Increased learning opportunities.
Sub-­theme 2.4 Use of chiropractic in post-­surgical care. Sub-­theme 2.5 Need for pre-­surgical assessment.
Sub-­theme 2.6 Integration facilitated by the Chiropractic Association of South Africa (CASA).

• Theme 3 Challenges facing chiropractors in the public healthcare sector Sub-­theme 3.1 Opposition from medical doctors.
Sub-­theme 3.2 Opposition from within the chiropractic profession. Sub-­theme 3.3 Inability to function as the primary practitioners.
Sub-­theme 3.4 Unfamiliar structure of the public health care sector.


Conclusion
A lack of clarity on the identity and role of chiropractic in the public healthcare sector emerged from the findings of this study. Individual chiropractors, the professional body (CASA) and the Allied Health Professions Council of South Africa (AHPCSA) need to engage in active roles in the integration of chiropractic into the public healthcare sector of South Africa.
Description: 
Submitted in partial compliance with the requirements for the Master’s Degree in Technology: Chiropractic, Durban University of Technology, Durban, South Africa, 2018.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10321/3065
DOI: https://doi.org/10.51415/10321/3065
Appears in Collections:Theses and dissertations (Health Sciences)

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